College President's Salaries[1]

College Presidents Ball Out [$4.9 million]

(MoneyWatch) If you were to guess who the nation’s highest paid college presidents are, I’m sure the president of Mountain State University would never make the list.

Charles H. Polk, who is the president of Mountain State University in Beckley, W. Va., was the sixth best paid private  college president in 2009, according to a report released today by The Chronicle of Higher Education. Mountain State devoted 3.5% of its budget to Polk’s compensation, which was a higher percentage than any other school in the nation.

According to federal government statistics, Mountain State’s four-year graduation rate is a mere five percent…[Yet] Charles H. Polk, who is the president of Mountain State University in Beckley, W. Va., was the sixth best paid private  college president in 2009

If Polk did something amazing to merit this largesse, it wasn’t apparent. According to federal government statistics, Mountain State’s four-year graduation rate is a mere five percent. The nursing program at the university, which attracts many nontraditional students, lost its bid last month to be nationally accredited. What’s more, the entire school is in danger of losing its regional accreditation.

College Ballers Club

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Related: The Top 10 at Public and Private Colleges

 hether they deserve the money or not, the salaries of college presidents continues to grow. In the latest Chronicle survey, 36 private college presidents earned more than $1 million. The four university presidents who made the most in the survey all retired or, in one case, died, which presumably led to greater packages.

The most stunning compensation went to Constantine N. Papadakis at Drexel University, who died in 2009. His total compensation was $4.9 million. While the president was paid lavishly, the students who attend Drexel must cope with the school’s mediocre financial aid practices. I’ve written about the Drexel’s aid policies here:  Anatomy of a stingy college and a generous one

Related: Students, Occupy protesters question Gutmann’s $1.3M salary

10 highest paid private college presidents

10. James L. Doti, Chapman University, $1,542,270

9. Richard C. Levin, Yale University, $1,627,649

8. Alfred H. Bloom, Swarthmore College, $1,756,293

7. Shirley Ann Jackson, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, $1,771,877

6. Charles H. Polk, Mountain State University, $1,843,746

5. Nicholas S. Zeppos, Vanderbilt University, $1,890,274

4. Henry S. Bienen, Northwestern University, $2,240,775

3. Donald V. DeRosa, University of the Pacific, $2,357,540

2. William R. Brody, Johns Hopkins University, $3,821,886

1. Constantine N. Papadakis, Drexel University, $4,912,127

 Average College President Compensation

The Chronicle calculated that the average total compensation of presidents at private colleges was $385,909 in 2009, while the typical professor’s compensation was $118,150.

Students at some campuses, including the University of Pennsylvania, have been protesting the salaries of college presidents at a time when college prices continue to rise far beyond inflation.

Regardless of the rich compensation of some college presidents, none of them came close to earning as much as Charles J. Weis, the University of Notre Dame’s football coach, who was fired in 2009. He walked away with a compensation package of $7,284,548.

By Lynn O’Shaughnessy via cbsnews.com

18 Comments on “College Presidents Ball Out [$4.9 million]

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